THE RHETORIC OF WILLIAM & HILLARY CLINTON

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
Allan Louden, Wake Forest University (louden@wfu.edu)

Last Updated: Sunday, 21-Oct-2012 15:13:02 EDT

Abbott, P. (2006). A "Long and Winding Road": Bill Clinton and the 1960s. Rhetoric & Public Affairs, 9, 1-20.

Anderson, K. V. (2002). From spouses to candidates: Hillary Rodham Clinton, Elizabeth Dole, and the gendered Office of U.S. President. Rhetoric & Public Affairs, 5, 105-132.

Banwart, M. C., & Kaid, L. L. (2003). Behind their skirts: Clinton's appeal to women voters. In R. E. Denton & R. L. Holloway (Eds.) Images, scandal, and communication strategies of the Clinton presidency (pp. 91-112). Westport, CT: Praeger/Greenwood.

Baym, G. (2003). Strategies of illumination: U.S. network news, Watergate and the Clinton affair. Rhetoric & Public Affairs, 6, 633-656

Benoit, W. L., Kluykovski, A. A., McHale, J. P., Airne, D. (2001). A fantasy theme analysis of political cartoons on the Clinton-Lewinsky-Starr affair. Critical Studies in Media Communication. 18, 377-394.

Benoit, W. L., & McHale, J. P. (1999). Kenneth Starr's image repair discourse viewed in 20/20. Communication Quarterly, 47, 265-280.

Benoit, W. L., & Wells, W. T. (1998). An analysis of three image restoration discourses on Whitewater. Journal of Public Advocacy, 3, 21-37.

Blaney, J. R., & Benoit, W. L. (2001). The Clinton scandals and the politics of image restoration. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers.

Bostdorff, D. M. (1996). Clinton's characteristic issue management style: Caution, conciliation, and conflict avoidance in the case of gays in the military. In R. E. Denton, and R. L. Holloway (Eds.). The Clinton presidency: Images, issues, and communication strategies (pp. 189-223) . Westport, CT: Praeger.

Brenders, D. A., & Fabj, V. (1993). Perceived control and the Clinton presidency: Political discourse in an alienated age. American Behavioral Scientist, 37, 211-224.

Brovero, A. F. (2000). "13 angry men": Dale Bumper's ad hominem argument in the impeachment trial of president Clinton. Argumentation and Advocacy, 36, 218-226.

Brown, L. M. (2007). The contemporary presidency: The greats and the great debate: President William J. Clinton’s use of presidential exemplars. Presidential Studies Quarterly 37, 124-138.

Brown, M. E,. & Gardetto, D. C. (2000). Representing Hillary Rodham Clinton: Gender, meaning, and news media. In A. Sreberny and L. Zoonen (eds.) Gender, politics and communication (pp. 21-51), Cresskill: Hampton Press.

Burns, J. M., & Sorenson, G. J. (1999). Dead center: Clinton-Gore leadership and the perils of moderation. New York: Scribner.

Butler, J. R. (2002). Somalia and the imperial savage: Continuities in the rhetoric of war. Western Journal of Communication, 66, 1-24.

Campbell, K. K. (1998). The discursive performance of femininity: Hating Hillary. Rhetoric and Public Affairs, 1, 1-19.

Carcasson, M., & Rice, M. (2005). The promise and failure of president Clinton's race initiative of 1997-1998: A rhetorical perspective. In J. A. Aune and E. D. Rigsby (Eds.) Civil rights rhetoric and the American presidency (pp. 301-338) . College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press.

Carlin, D. B., & Howard, C. C. (1994). Bill Clinton’s campaigns for governor of Arkansas. In S. A. Smith (Ed.), Bill Clinton on stump, state, and stage: The Rhetorical road to the White House (pp. 13-22). Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press.

Carpenter, R. H. (1994). The stylistic persona of Bill Clinton: From Arkansas and Aristotelian attica. In S. A. Smith (Ed.), Bill Clinton on stump, state, and stage: The Rhetorical road to the White House (pp. 101-132). Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press.

Cos, G. C., & Snee, B. J. (2001). “New York, New York”: Being and creating identity in the 2000 New York state senate race. American Behavioral Scientist, 44, 2014-2029.

Corrigan, M. (2000). The transformation of going public: President Clinton, the First Lady, and health care reform. Political Communication, 17, 149-168.

Denton, R. E., & Holloway, R. L. (Eds.) (2003). Images, scandal, and communication strategies of the Clinton presidency. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Denton, R. E., & Holloway, R. L. (1996). Clinton and the town hal meetings: Mediated conversation and the risk of being "in touch." In R. E. Denton, and R. L. Holloway (Eds.). The Clinton presidency: Images, issues, and communication strategies (pp. 17-41) . Westport, CT: Praeger.

Denton, R. E., & Holloway, R. L. (Eds.) (1996). The Clinton presidency: Images, issues, and communication strategies. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Dervin, D. (1997). Group fantasy and its discontents during the Clinton administration. Journal of Psychohistory, 25, 184-193.

Dover, E. D. (1998). The presidential election of 1996: Clinton's incumbency and television. Praeger.

Durant. R. F. (2006). A "New Covenant" kept: Core values, presidential communications, and the paradox of the Clinton presidency. Presidential Studies Quarterly, 36, 345-372.

Falk, E. (2009). Press, passion, and Portsmouth: Marratives about "crying"on the campaign trail. Agumentation and Advocacy, 46, 51-63.

Fernandez, D. G. (1994). Whitewater, troopergate and the media. Editor and Publisher, 12, 16-18.

Fine, G. A., & Eisenberg, E. (2002). Tricky Dick and Slick Willy: Despised presidents and generational imprinting. American Behavioral Scientist, 46, 553-565.

Getz, D. C. (1994). Rhetoric and ritual in the Arkansas inaugural addresses. In S. A. Smith (Ed.), Bill Clinton on stump, state, and stage: The Rhetorical road to the White House (pp. 23-51). Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press.

Glinert, L. (1999). Apologizing to the nation. American Communication Journal 2.2, http://acjournal.org/holdings/vol2/Iss2/editorials/glinert/index.html.

Golden, J. L. (2001). The Clinton factor in the presidential contest of 2000. American Behavioral Scientist, 44, 2269-2287.

Goodnight, T. G., & Olson, K. M. (2006). Shared power, foreign policy, and Haiti 1994: Public memories of war and race. Rhetoric & Public Affairs, 9, 601-634.

Gronbeck, B. E. (1999). Underestimating generic expectations: Clinton's apologies of August 17, 1998. American Communication Journal 2.2, http://acjournal.org/holdings/vol2/Iss2/editorials/gronbeck/index.html.

Gunn, J. (2010). On speech and public release. Rhetoric & Public Affairs, 13, 1–42. (Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama).

Gutgold, N. D. (2010). Almost Madam President: Why Hillary Clinton "Won" in 2008. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield

Hacker, K. L. (1996). Virtual democracy: A critique of the Clinton administration citizen-White House electronic mail system. In R. E. Denton, and R. L. Holloway (Eds.). The Clinton presidency: Images, issues, and communication strategies (pp. 43-76) . Westport, CT: Praeger.

Han, L. C. (2006). New Strategies for an Old Medium: The Weekly Radio Addresses of Reagan and Clinton. Congress & the Presidency, 33, 25-45.

Hillygus, D. S., Jackman, S. (2003). Voter decision making in election 2000: Campaign effects, partisan activation, and the Clinton legacy. American Journal of Political Science. 47, 583-.

Holenberg, J. (1998). Reelecting Bill Clinton: Why America chose a 'New' democrat. Syracuse Univ. Press.

Holloway, R. L. (1998). Taking the middle ground: Clinton's rhetoric of conjoined values. In R. E. Denton (Ed.) The 1996 presidential campaign: A communication perspective (pp. 123-141). Westport, CT: Praeger.

Holloway, R. L. (1996). The Clintons and the health care crisis: Opportunity lost, promise unfulfilled. In R. E. Denton, and R. L. Holloway (Eds.). The Clinton presidency: Images, issues, and communication strategies (pp. 159-187) . Westport, CT: Praeger.

Hogan, J. M. (1999). Public opinion and journalistic voyeurism: The lesson of the Clinton apology. American Communication Journal 2.2, http://acjournal.org/holdings/vol2/Iss2/editorials/hogan/index.html

Jamieson, K. H. (1995). Hillary Clinton as Rorschach Test. In Beyond the double bind: Women and leadership (pp. 22-52). New York: Oxford University Press.

Jamieson, K. H., Falk, E., & Scherr, S. (1999). The enthymeme gap in the 1996 presidential campaign." PS: Political Science and Politics, 32, 12-16.

Kagay, M. R. (1999). Public opinion and polling during presidential scandal and impeachment. Public Opinion Quarterly, 63, 449-463.

Kaid. L. L. (1997). Effects of the television spots on image of Dole and Clinton. American Behavioral Scientist, 40. 1085-1094.

Kaid, L. L., Tedesco, J., Chanslor, M, & Roper, C. (1994). Clinton’s videostyle: A study of the verbal, nonverbal, and video production techniques in campaign advertising. Journal of Communication Studies, 12, 11-20.

Kaid, L. L., Tedesco, J., & Spiker, J. (1996). Media conflicts over Clinton policies: Political advertising and the battle for public opinion. In R. E. Denton & R. H. Holloway (Eds.), The Clinton presidency: Images, issues, and communication strategies (pp. 103-122). Westport, CT: Praeger.

Kelley, C. E. (2001). The rhetoric of first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton: Crisis management discourse. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Kiewe, A. (1999), The private vs. the public: A critical assessment of Clinton's August 17, 1998 address. American Communication Journal 2.2, http://acjournal.org/holdings/vol2/Iss2/editorials/kiewe/index.html.

Koesten, J., & Rowland, R. C. (2004). The rhetoric of atonement Communication Studies, 55, 68-87.

Kramer, M. R., & Olson, K. M. (2002). The strategic potential of sequencing apologia stases: President Clinton's self-defense in the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Western Journal of Communication, 66, 347-368.

Laham, N. (1996). A lost cause: Bill Clinton’s campaign for national health insurance. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Langman, L. (2002). Suppose they gave a culture war and not one came: Zippergate and the carnivalization of politics. American Behavioral Scientist, 46, 501-534.

Lawrence, R. G., & Rose, M. (2010). Hillary Clinton's race for the White House: Gender politics & the media on the campaign trail. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner,

Llewellyn, J. T. (1994). Bill Clinton’s stump speaking. In S. A. Smith (Ed.), Bill Clinton on stump, state, and stage: The Rhetorical road to the White House (pp. 52-72). Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press.

Marlow, G. R. (1994). Dodging charges and charges of dodging: Bill Clinton's defense on the character issue. In S. A. Smith (Ed.), Bill Clinton on stump, state, and stage: The Rhetorical road to the White House (pp. 150-162). Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press.

Miller, A. H. (1999). Sex, politics and public opinion: What political scientists really learned from the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal.PS: Political Science & Politics, 32, 722-723.

Miller, J. J. (2004). Argument efficacy: evaluating the public argument of president Bill Clinton's impeachment crisis. Argumentation and Advocacy, 40, 226-245.

Mueller, J. E. (2008). Tag teaming the press: How Bill and Hillary Clinton work together to handle the media. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Muir, J. K. (1994). Clinton goes to Town Hall. In S. A. Smith (Ed.), Bill Clinton on stump, state, and stage: The Rhetorical road to the White House (pp. 341-364). Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press.

Muir, J. K, & Benitez, L. M. (1996). Redefining the role of the first lady: The rhetorical style of Hillary Rodham Clinton. In R. E. Denton, and R. L. Holloway (Eds.). The Clinton presidency: Images, issues, and communication strategies (pp. 139-158) . Westport, CT: Praeger.

Murphy, J. M. (2002). Rhetoric, and the presidency of William Jefferson Clinton. In L. G. Dorsey (Ed.), The presidency and rhetorical leadership (pp. 231-251). College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press.

Murphy, J. M. (1997). Inventing authority: Bill Clinton, Marlin Luther King, Jr., and the orchestration of rhetorical traditions. Quarterly Journal of Speech, 83, 71-89.

Myers, D. D. (1993). New technology and the 1992 Clinton presidential campaign. American Behavioral Scientist, 37, 181-187.

Niven, D. (2001). Bias in the News: Partisanship and negativity in media coverage of presidents George Bush and Bill Clinton. Harvard International Journal of Press/Politics, 6, 31-46.

Novak, J. (1997). Hope springs eternal: The reinvention of America in Bill Clinton’s 1996 campaign biography video. American Behavioral Scientist, 40, 1048-1057.

Olson, K. M. (2004). Democratic enlargement's value hierarchy and rhetorical forms: An analysis of Clinton's use of a post-cold war symbolic frame to justify military interventions. Presidential Studies Quarterly, 34, 307-340.

Owen, D. (1997). Talk radio and evaluations of president Clinton. Political Communication, 14, 333-353.

Parry-Giles, S. J. (2001). Political authenticity, television news, and Hillary Rodham Clinton. In R. P, Hart and B. H. Sparrow (Eds.), Politics, discourse, and American society: New agendas (pp. 211-227). Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Pub., Inc.

Parry-Giles, S. J., & Parry-Giles, T. (2000). Collective memory, political nostalgia, and the rhetorical presidency: Bill Clinton's commemoration of the March on Washington, August 28, 1998. Quarterly Journal of Speech, 86, 417-437.

President William Jefferson Clinton: Testing the Boundaries of Apologia in Public and Private Spheres, Editorial Forum (1999). American Communication Journal, 2. http://acjournal.org/holdings/vol2/Iss2/curtain3.html

Procter, D. E., & Ritter, K. (1996). Inaugurating the Clinton presidency: Regenerative rhetoric and the American community. In R. E. Denton, and R. L. Holloway (Eds.). The Clinton presidency: Images, issues, and communication strategies (pp. 1-16) . Westport, CT: Praeger.

Rein, I. J. (1994). Imagining the image: Reinventing the Clintons. In S. A. Smith (Ed.), Bill Clinton on stump, state, and stage: The Rhetorical road to the White House (pp. 187-200). Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press.

Renshon, S. A. (1996). High hopes, the Clinton presidency and the politics of ambition. New York, NY: New York University Press.

Renshon, S. A. (Ed.) (1995). The Clinton presidency: Campaigning, governing, and the psychology of leadership. Boulder, CO: Westview.

Richards. R. S. (2011). Cyborgs on the world stage: Hillary Clinton and the rhetorical performances of iron ladies. Feminist Formations, 23, 1-25.

Rojek, C. (2002). The post-auratic president. American Behavioral Scientist, 46, 487-500.

Rosteck, T. (1994). The intertextuality of "The Man From Hope": Bill Clinton as a person, as persona, as star. In S. A. Smith (Ed.), Bill Clinton on stump, state, and stage: The Rhetorical road to the White House (pp. 223-248). Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press.

Seib, P. (1994). Riding the roller coaster: Bill Clinton and the news media. In S. A. Smith (Ed.), Bill Clinton on stump, state, and stage: The Rhetorical road to the White House (pp. 273-291). Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press.

Sewell, E. H., Jr. (1996). "the bad days are part of it": Editorial cartoonists on Clinton's first year. In R. E. Denton, and R. L. Holloway (Eds.). The Clinton presidency: Images, issues, and communication strategies (pp. 77-102) . Westport, CT: Praeger.

Shah, D. V., Watts, M. D., Domke, D., & Fan, D. P. (2002). News framing and cueing of issue regimes: Explaining Clinton's public approval in spite of scandal. Public Opinion Quarterly, 66, 339-370.

Shelton, M. W. (2000). Talk of power, power of talk: The 1994 health care reform debate and beyond. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Shepard, R. (2009). Confonting gender bias, finding a voice: Hillary Clinton and the New Hampshiore crying incident. Argumentation and Advocacy, 46, 64-77.

Simons, H. W. (2000). A dilemma-center analysis of Clinton's August 17th Apologia: Implications for rhetorical theory and method. Quarterly Journal of Speech, 86, 438-453.

Smith, C. A. (1998). The rhetorical transformation of the political coalition: Bill Clinton, 1992-1996. In R. E. Denton (Ed.) The 1996 presidential campaign: A communication perspective (pp. 229-262). Westport, CT: Praeger.

Smith, C. A. (1997). Bill Clinton and the 1996 presidential campaign. American Behavioral Scientist, 40, 1250-1263.

Smith, C. A. (1996). "Rough stretches and honest disagreements": Is Bill Clinton redefining the rhetorical presidency? In R. E. Denton, and R. L. Holloway (Eds.). The Clinton presidency: Images, issues, and communication strategies (pp. 225-247) . Westport, CT: Praeger.

Smith, C. A. (1994). The Jeremiadic logic of Bill Clinton’s policy speeches. In S. A. Smith (Ed.), Bill Clinton on stump, state, and stage: The Rhetorical road to the White House (pp. 73-100). Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press.

Smith, L. D. (1994). The New York convention: Bill Clinton and "A Place Called Hope." In S. A. Smith (Ed.), Bill Clinton on stump, state, and stage: The Rhetorical road to the White House (pp. 201-222). Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press.

Smith, S. A. (1994). The rhetorical invention of Bill Clinton. In S. A. Smith (Ed.), Bill Clinton on stump, state, and stage: The Rhetorical road to the White House (pp. 1-12). Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press.

Smith, S. A. (Ed.) (1996). Preface to the presidency: Selected Speeches of Bill Clinton, 1974-1992. Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press.

Snee, B. J. (2001). Clinton and Vietnam: A case for amnestic rhetoric. Communication Quarterly, 49, 189-202.

Sulfaro, V. A. (2007). Affective evaluations of first ladies: A comparison of Hillary Clinton and Laura Bush, Presidential Studies Quarterly 37, 486–514.

Timmerman, D. (1996). The 1992 presidential candidate films: The contrasting narratives of George Bush and Bill Clinton. Presidential Studies Quarterly, 26, 364-373.

Vartabedian, R. A., & Vartabedian, L. (2003). Clinton's address to the nation: A case study of apologetic goals. Speaker and Gavel, 40, 28-46.

Veil, S. (2005). To answer, or not to answer— That is the question of the hour: Image restoration strategies and media coverage of past drug use questions in the presidential campaigns of Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. Speaker and Gavel, 42, 58-78.

Waldman, M. (2000). POTUS speaks: Finding the words that defined the Clinton administration. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Walker, M. (1996). The president we deserve: Bill Clinton, his rise, falls, and comebacks. New York: Crown.

Walton, D. (2000). Use of ad hominen argument in political discourse: The Battalino case from the impeachment trial of president Clinton. Argumentation and Advocacy, 36, 179-195.

West, D. M. (2003). Responsibility frenzies in news coverage: Dissecting a Hillary Clinton rumor. Press/Politics, 8, 104-114.

Willock, R. K. (1996). The compromising Clinton: Images of failure, a record of success. In R. E. Denton, and R. L. Holloway (Eds.). The Clinton presidency: Images, issues, and communication strategies (pp. 124-138) . Westport, CT: Praeger.

Willock, R. K. (1994). Easy access to sloppy truths: The ’92 presidential media campaign. In S. A. Smith (Ed.), Bill Clinton on stump, state, and stage: The Rhetorical road to the White House (pp. 292-314). Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press.

Woessner, M. C. (2005). Scandal, elites, and presidential popularity: Considering the importance of cues in public support of the President.
Presidential Studies Quarterly, 35, 94-115.

Yenerall, K. M. 2001. The cultural pulpit: Rhetoric, executive power, and the Clinton presidency. Dissertation Abstracts International.

Zaller, J. (2001). Monica Lewinsky and the mainsprings of American politics. In W. L. Bennett & R. M. Entman (Eds.), Mediated politics: Communication in the future of democracy (pp. 252-278). New York: NY: Cambridge University Press.

Zaller, J. R. (1998). Monica Lewinsky's contribution to political science. PS: Political Science and Politics, 33, 182-189.

Return to Political Communication HomePage