Wake Forest University
Presentation Assignment #1
Presidential Rhetoric


Instructions: First Round of In-Class Presentations:  There will be 5 in-class panels. Group of four will present on their pre 1900 era readings (assigned from the list below). Each person will have five minutes to present the essence of their piece, the “so what” that can be extracted from the reading, and not all the “details.” This will be followed by Q&A from the class and a panel discussion of the ideas introduced in the individual summary statements.
Will Sign up for presentations in Wednesday class

First Round of In-Class Presentations:  There will be 6 in-class panels. Group of four will present on their pre 1900 era readings (assigned from the list below). Each person will have five minutes to present the essence of their piece, the “so what” that can be extracted from the reading, and not all the “details.” This will be followed by Q&A from the class and a panel discussion of the ideas introduced in the individual summary statements.

Sept 21, Monday (3 persons)
Panelists: Alex Gove, Cierra Graham, Caitlin Farrell
George Washington (1789-1797)
Hostetler, M. J. (2002). Washington's Farewell Address: Distance as bane and blessing. Rhetoric & Public Affairs, 3, 393-407.
Lucas, S. E. (2002). George Washington and the rhetoric of presidential leadership. In L. G. Dorsey (Ed.), The presidency and rhetorical leadership (pp. 42-72). College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press.
Lucas, S. E. (1986). Genre criticism and historical context: The case of George Washington's first inaugural address. Southern Speech Communication Journal, 51, 354-370.
John Adams (1797-1801)
Farrell, J. M. (2002). Classical virtue and presidential fame: John Adams, leadership, and the Franco-American crisis. In L. G. Dorsey (Ed.), The presidency and rhetorical leadership (pp. 73-94). College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press.

Sept 23 (3 persons)
Panelists: AlexWiesner, Shaney Soderquist, Erin Kerr
Thomas Jefferson (1801-1809)
Browne, S. H. (2002). "The Circle of Our Felicities": Thomas Jefferson's first inaugural address and the rhetoric of nationhood. Rhetoric & Public Affairs, 3, 409-438.
Kaplan, L. S. (2002). Jefferson vs. Napoleon: The limits of rhetoric. In L. G. Dorsey (Ed.), The presidency and rhetorical leadership (pp. 95-114). College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press.
Vivian, B. (2002). Jefferson’s other. Quarterly Journal of Speech, 88, 284-302.
James Madison (1809-1817)
James Monroe (1817-1825)
John Quincy Adams (1825-1829)
Andrew Jackson (1829-1837)
Ellis, R. J., & Kirk, S. (1998). Jefferson, Jackson and the origins of presidential mandate. In R. J. Ellis (Ed.) Speaking to the people: The rhetorical presidency in historical perspective (pp. 35-65). Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.
Browne, S. H. (2008). Andrew Johnson and the politics of character. In M. J. Medhurst (Ed.), Before the rhetorical presidency (pp. 194-212). College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press.

Sept 25 (3 persons)
Panelists: DavidTokarz, Will Sears, Holly Austin
Martin Van Buren (1837-1841)
Zaeske, S. (2008). Little magic: Martin Van Buren and the politics of gender. In M. J. Medhurst (Ed.), Before the rhetorical presidency (pp. 44-62). College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press.
William Henry Harrison (1841)
John Tyler (1841-1845)
Zarefsky, D. (2008). John Tyler and the rhetoric of the accidental presidency. In M. J. Medhurst (Ed.), Before the rhetorical presidency (pp. 63-82). College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press.
James K. Polk (1845-1849)
Campbell, K. K. (2008). James Knox Polk: The first imperial president? In M. J. Medhurst (Ed.), Before the rhetorical presidency (pp. 83-105). College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press.

Sept 30 (3 persons)
Panelists: Meghan Haenn, Justine Tien, Justin Herzig
Zachary Taylor (1849-1850)
Ellis, R. J., & Walker, A. (2007). Policy speech in the nineteenth century rhetorical presidency: The case of Zachary Taylor's 1849 tour. Presidential Studies Quarterly, 37, 248-269.
Millard Fillmore (1850-1853)
Franklin Pierce (1853-1857)
Hartnett, S. J. (2008). Franklin Pierce and the Exuberant Hauter of an age of extremes: A love song for America in six movements. In M. J. Medhurst (Ed.), Before the rhetorical presidency (pp. 106-165). College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press.
James Buchanan (1857-1861)
Terrill, R. E. (2008). James Buchanan: Romancing the union. In M. J. Medhurst (Ed.), Before the rhetorical presidency (pp. 166-193). College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press.
Oct 2 (2 persons)
Panelists: Phil Negus, Mark Russell, Akira Fitzgerald
Abraham Lincoln (1861-1865)
Leff, M. (1988). Dimensions of temporality in Lincoln's second inaugural. Communication Reports, 1, 26-31.
Leff, M. C., & Mohrmann, G. P. (1974). Lincoln at Cooper Union: A rhetorical analysis of the text. Quarterly Journal of Speech, 60, 346-358.
Gross, Alan G.(204). Lincoln's use of constitutive metaphors. Rhetoric and Public Affairs, 7, 173-90.
White, Ronald C. The Eloquent President: A Portriat of Lincoln Through his words. Random House, 2005.
Zarefsky, D. (1998). Consistency and change in Lincoln's rhetoric about equality. Rhetoric and Public Affairs, 1, 21-44.
Oct 5 (2 persons)
Panelists: Ryan Semeniuk, Allie Bodemann
Finnegan, C. A. (2005). Recognizing Lincoln: Image vernaculars in nineteenth-century visual culture. Rhetoric & Public Affairs, 8, 31-57.
Pfau, M W. (2005). Evaluating conspiracy: Narrative, argument, and idelogy in Lincoln's "House Divided" speech. Argumentation & Advocacy, 42, 57-73.
White, Ronald C. Lincoln's Greatest Speech: The Second Inaugural. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2002.

 

Oct. 7 (3 persons)
Panelists: Robert Warren, David Weaver, Matt Woodlief
Andrew Johnson (1865-1869)
Ulysses S. Grant (1869-1877)
Goethals, G. R. (2008). Resolute commander for just peace: The rhetoric of Ulysses S. Grant. In M. J. Medhurst (Ed.), Before the rhetorical presidency (pp. 213-242). College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press.
Rutherford B. Hayes (1877-1881)
Slagell, A. R. (2008). The challenges of reunification: Rutherford B. Hayes on the close race and the racial divide. In M. J. Medhurst (Ed.), Before the rhetorical presidency (pp. 243-266). College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press.
James A. Garfield (1881)
Chester Arthur (1881-1885)
Grover Cleveland (1885-1889)
Leff, M. (2008). Grover Cleveland and the nonrhetorical presidency. In M. J. Medhurst (Ed.), Before the rhetorical presidency (pp. 289-306). College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press.

Oct 9 (3 persons)
Panelists: Travis Wadkins, Katie Breidenbach, Ike Opara
Benjamin Harrison (1889-1893)
Grover Cleveland (1893-1897)
William McKinley (1897-1901)
Harpine, W. D. (2008). William McKinley and the emergence of the modern rhetorical presidency. In M. J. Medhurst (Ed.), Before the rhetorical presidency (pp. 307-328). College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press.
Harpine, W. D. (2000). Playing to the press in McKinley's front porch campaign: The early weeks of the nineteenth century pseudo-event. RSQ: Rhetoric Society Quarterly, 30, 73-90.
Theodore Roosevelt (1901-1909)
Buehler, D. O. (1998). Permanence and change in Theodore Roosevelt's conservation jeremiad. Western Journal of Communication, 62, 439-458.
Brands, H. W. (2002). Politics as performance art: The body english of Theodore Roosevelt. In L. G. Dorsey (Ed.), The presidency and rhetorical leadership (pp. 115-128). College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press.
Stuckey, M. E. (2006). Establishing the rhetorical presidency through presidential rhetoric: Theodore Roosevelt and the Brownsville Raid. Quarterly Journal of Speech, 92, 287-309.


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